Tag Archives: Devon

A Bench Edit

Jude’s Bench Challenge for June is to process and image with an arty effect, hooray, that’s licence to play!

I’ve used Photoshop, Pixlr and Snapseed to create this image, but I can’t remember what steps I took to get to the end result.

IMG_0565_edited-junebench

The photo was taken on the beach path at Dawlish Warren in February. The perspective makes it appear that its a row of single seats but they are in fact benches for two or three peopel. I do quite like the end result and I expect I’ll try some more this month. Perhaps you’ll join in too?

A Walk at Morte Point

Last weekend my friend Lindy and I went for a walk up in north Devon. I wanted to go to see Verity at the same time so I found a walk on the coast that was just 2.3 miles, perfect for the Dido and Daisy as well.

We arrived at Mortehoe, a pretty village, just before noon and walked up the road between the pub and church.

Mortehoe village
Mortehoe village

The lane climbing upwards was trimmed with spring wild flowers.

Wildflowers in the hedgerow
Wildflowers in the hedgerow

And the walls were full of life.

Navelwort waiting to bloom Jude
Navelwort waiting to bloom Jude

We walked past a pretty cemetery.

Cemetery with a view
Cemetery with a view

And the walk began

Back to the path

Looking west
Looking west
That's close enough to a sheer drop
That’s close enough to a sheer drop

There were sheep everywhere and the lambs were adorable

The lambs were at the toddler stage
The lambs were at the toddler stage

The path stretched ahead into bright sun.

The south west coast path
The south west coast path
Woolacombe is fading into the distance
Woolacombe is fading into the distance

We stopped frequently so the dogs could cool down, so I zoomed in again.

Something strange over there
Something strange over there

Can you see the stegosaurus back bone?

By now we were warming up, and wishing we’d brought all of our picnic lunch, instead of just a packet of crisps. But the walk was lovely in every direction.

Deceiving but a very steep drop
Deceiving but a very steep drop

There were some interesting rock formations.


The crest of the hill in the photo above was soon just above us.

The stegasaurus
The stegasaurus

Some suicidal sheep!

Sure footed sheep
Sure footed sheep

 

Not far to the point
Not far to the point
One more bend
One more bend

The rock was changing colour as we walked east towards Morte Point.

Made it at last

Morte Point
Morte Point

Morte, as I’m sure you know means death and it’s believed that Morte point got its name because the treacherous rocks caused a number of shipwrecks over the centuries. Smuggling was rife, and some of the wrecks may have been helped along the way by wreckers walking the coast with lamps to confuse the sailors in the dark. Having seen this rcraggy coastline, it must have been incredibly dangerous. According to the South West Coast Path website,

The Normans dubbed it the ‘Death Stone’, and claimed that ‘Morte is the place which heaven made last and the devil will take first.’

Time to head on.

Going east again
Going east again

The walk continued steeply.

Shallow water
Shallow water

My camera captured seals here but just as dark bobbing blobs.

The seals didn't want to sunbath
The seals didn’t want to sunbath

We were out of water and fairly certain that we’d missed a turning by the time we reached here.

The turning point
The turning point

But a slight hint of a path up to the right led us back the way we needed to take.

Familiar ground
Familiar ground

The gate leads through to the road by the cemetery.
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The village shop supplied cold drinks and ice cream, which we followed with our picnic. The dogs flopped in the shade, tired but happy. The pedometer on my phone said I’d walked 5.5 miles, not the planned 2.3, but we stilled had some energy left to pootle around Ilfracombe.
I don’t know if Jo will be doing her Monday Walk this week but there’s always another day.

Another Bench by the Sea

Jude, I promise you there is a beach down there when the tide is out. The problem is you would need to swim, paddle board or arrive by boat. Or, you could roly-poly, because unless you ‘re one of the hundreds of sheep that live on the side of the hill below the coast path, I don’t think you could walk down to it.

beachbench
This bench is on the South West Coast Path, England’s longest waymarked footpath, 630 miles around the peninsula from Minehead in Somerset, via Cornwall and Devon to Poole in Dorset. It goes without saying that is it one of the best walks in the world. Pick yourself a stretch when you visit the UK.
Jude’s Bench Challenge for May is ‘At the Beach’ and you still have time to join in.

Strolling Route 2

I set off to Dart’s Farm today for a stroll around their fields with the dogs, they have a farm walk, a bird hide and fishing lakes as well as the shopping experience they are well known for. It was a beautiful afternoon and I decided that I wanted to walk a bit further than Dart’s could offer, so I crossed over and took a path that joins the Exe Trail, which runs up the river Exe to Exeter and back down the other side. It’s part of National Cycle Network route 2 that will eventually run all the way from Kent to Cornwall.


The section that runs alongside the Exe is around 16 miles and must surely be one of the loveliest. Just below Topsham on the picture, you can see Darts Farm, where I began,


it’s the  modern building in the distant background to the right. The white house boat must belong to someone, I hope they rescue it before it rots away, I know I’d like to.

The bridge above has one of the newest sections, with great views over Bowling Green marsh.


I’m striding along now, parallel to the railway line that I travelled on the day before, taking two of my grandchildren to the beach at Exmouth. The old bridge spans an area with an inlet that probably floods at times.


it’s certainly soggy today.
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I’m heading towards Exton now and the views of the river are gorgeous.But the railway line and a fence are in the way. Never mind, the path  turns inland through the little village of very expensive houses, and out the other side.

The river gets wider and Exmouth is in the distance, my favourite estuary. I pass by the Royal Marines commando training centre,

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but there are no fit men to watch today!
rou13
Instead I pass a group of young people in fatigues yomping along. They may be cadets, definitely not marines, they were having too much fun.

It’s a really warm day and while I don’t mind walking in full sun, the dogs are getting elderly so we sit, so  they can rest and nibble on the cleavers, and then retrace our steps. We didn’t quite reach Lympstone.


The tide was lower as I headed back inland, there were fewer cyclists and walkers going by, and the only sounds were birdsong. I had a lovely walk, around five miles and flat apart from going through Exton.
I hope you enjoyed it, and Jo too, as I’m posting for her Monday Walk.

Distant Beaches

A few days ago I was reading a favourite blog friends post about beaches, and something seemed familiar.  I’ve seen photos of many wonderful places since I’ve been blogging, it’s great to see parts of the world I’ll probably never get to visit in reality. Australia is one of those places and Eurobodalla beach in particular, and yet I feel a connection. So when Meg posted images of Broulee beach I looked through my photos to try to find out why. har1 These rows where Dido and Daisy are paddling remind me of Meg’s beach har4har5As does this crisscrossing in the rock. har2and the view at Hartland is rather like Narooma!

And these are similar to Meg’s Smugglers Cove photos. har3 Craggy rocks with winkles. har8 Crops of determined little flowers har6Even surfers, but I expect they are colder than any near Meg. Pay a visit to Meg and see if you don’t agree with me, Hartland in North Devon has a lot in common with these beaches in New South Wales.  To find Hartland on a map of the UK, first find South Wales, then go due south.