Happy Places

Krista’s challenge this week is . . .

Have you ever felt like the world was being a bit too rowdy? Where things and people were pushing in, crowding out your quiet thoughts — the ones that need time and space to surface?

Whenever I feel like an away day it’s invariably to the moor, the coast or a beautiful garden. Luckily there are many, many choices of each in wonderful Devon.
For total escapism there is Dartmoor. There are busy places there, Haytor on a summer weekend has a great many visitors, some of whom do not even get out of their cars. Even there, if you’re prepared to walk and scramble a little way, you will find some peace.
For those in the know there are still places where you might not meet a soul, this is one of them.
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Not a lot of rowdiness going on.
For a bit of a stroll and some invigorating sea air, try this Bristol Channel view.
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Some of the path can be a bit hard on the knees though!
If a pootle, with lunch or tea and cake is called for – and it often is,
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nothing on earth beats an English garden for beauty, peacefulness, fragrance and colour.
Where is your happy place?

A symbolic bridge

Bridges, they cross rivers, roads, railways, and valleys and borders. They can be built of stone, wood, rope and metal. Their symbolism is vast, at birth as we separate from mother, as transition points throughout life, and into the unknown of death

That is the road we all have to take, over the bridge of sighs into eternity’ Soren Kierkegaard.

We speak of building bridges instead of walls when relationships have broken down .

We all have favourite bridges don’t we? this is one of mine. It’s a Clapper bridge and if you’ve ever travelled across Dartmoor in Devon there’s a fair chance that you’ve stopped and admired it.

Clapper bridge
Clapper bridge

It’s believed that it dates back to the 13th century to enable pack horses to cross the river Dart.  Personally it symbolizes a connection with that distant past, a walk back in time.  How many feet have walked across it since those ancestors laboured over its construction – from slabs of granite? How much or little has that landscape changed since then?

How would you photograph a symbol that has meaning for you? that’s this week’s photo challenge, perhaps you’ll join in.

A Moorland Muse

Show us your muse, says Brie Anne Demkiw. What subject keeps me coming back? Devon of course, it’s the most wonderful place in England and I’m very lucky to live here. I’ve posted many times about the coast, the estuary and the river, and a little about my city. If I think of a muse, what springs to mind is Dartmoor, that expanse of wilderness that I love. Here are a few images from the moor, I hope you find them inspiring too.


Join in here at the Daily Post

Dartmoor Walls

 

Containing livestock
Containing livestock

Like many upland areas around the UK and the rest of the world, dry stone walls can be found all over Dartmoor. Some are hundreds of years old and have fallen into disrepair, others are well maintained and still functioning as they were intended.

Near Scorhill
Near Scorhill
The Two Bridges road
The Two Bridges road
North of Two Bridges, towards Wistman's Wood
North of Two Bridges, towards Wistman’s Wood

The name refers to the lack of any mortar used in the construction, although often nature takes its course and soil arrives and fills in the gaps.

Up close and covered with lichen and moss
Up close, covered with lichen and moss

I’ve always loved these old walls,  to run my hand across the granite is a journey back to the dawn of time on our planet, and to make contact with all the hands that have touched before me. Dartmoor’s dry stone walls may not be as grand as those built by the Incas in Peru and I don’t suppose they can be seen from space like the Great  Wall of China, but they are living, breathing masterpieces in their own way.

Cheri Lucas Rowlands has created the photos challenge of Wall this week, click to join in.

 

 

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Shadowed

 

Experimenting with shadows can be a fun and rewarding way to push yourself to try something new with your camera, your subject, and your surroundings. Shadows can also add depth and drama to an otherwise ordinary image.
For this week’s Photo Challenge, find the shadows. You can choose a literal interpretation and shoot an actual shadow, or you can play with the light and dark, and create a moody scene, or capture your subject in a rich and interesting way.

So, I’ve tried to choose some images where something is shadowed!

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The courtyard at Bridport Arts Centre is shadowed by a decorative canopy and the buildings on each side of Buckydoo Square.
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She’s beautiful, you’ll just have to believe me as she is so well shadowed.
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A Dartmoor day with the sort of weather that makes the clouds shadow the distant moor, beyond Scorhill.
Maybe you will join in?
https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/shadowed/

Converging Stone Rows

Photos are visual spaces where shapes and lines, objects, and people come together, says Ben Huberman at the Daily Post and he asks for photos with the theme of ‘Converge’. I find the bronze age stone rows on Dartmoor fascinating, imagine the people that created these way back in time. My photo shows some of the stone rows that converge at the top of the hill above Scorhill circle heading towards Batworthy and Fernworthy.

converge
If you have photos that converge – and who doesn’t? share them here.
http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/converge/

I met some ladies . . .

Driving across Dartmoor the other day I squinted, not quite believing what I saw. I’ve often seen a solitary highland cow but never a whole bunch of them together and right by the side of the road. I slowed down onto the verge, expecting them to get up and walk away but they didn’t. I opened the car window and started snapping but couldn’t get a clear view so I got out. Again, I thought they would disappear or more likely, make me disappear!

Instead they let me get to within six feet of them and I could probably have got even closer but didn’t want to push my luck.

So here they are, hope they make you smile.