Category Archives: Weekly Photo Challenge

The Intricacies of nature and man

The Bear Hut at National Trust Killerton was reputedly created to house a real live bear in the grounds of the property. I’m really not convinced, I think it was more likely a great playhouse for the children of the family. Either way it’s a cute little place with some interesting decorative features, including this pretty ceiling studded with natural pine cones arranged by man in a pattern on something like hessian.
intricate

This well nibbled leaf has been made into an intricate design by one of nature’s creatures.
intricate2

Some human has used delicate silk to create an intricate design on these hats.
intricate4

When I got my current mobile phone a couple of year ago I was experimenting with photographing a fast running stream. What I didn’t realise at the time was that I had it on a setting called Harris Shutter that does weird things to images, I nearly deleted it, but kept it because I like the intricate mix of colours!
intricate3

This carved and painted arch is inside Exeter Cathedral, it’s one of many intricate and ornate features there.
intricate5

When I started thinking about this challenge and looking at some photos, I concluded that and awful lot of my photos fit the bill, because I like to focus on little details. How about you?
You know how to join in!

Motion and light

You probably haven’t noticed my absence, but I’ve been missing for a few days. When I learnt last night that this weeks photo challenge was motion, I was quite pleased because I was on my way out to see the Font màgica de Montjuïc. Yes, I was in Barcelona!
I haven’t had time to sort out my photos yet, but here are some that I hope you like. The fountain was magical indeed, an atmosphere of happiness and joy as its colours played along to the music.

To see how other people have interpreted the challenge, visit Jen and you might like to join in.

A Morning Challenge in Heavitree

 

This morning person has no problem getting up, but finds it harder to get out the door. Today I was awake at 4.45, stressing about all the things I have to do and up at 5.20!I love the quiet hours around dawn, so yesterday partly because of the photo challenge, and partly because I was going east 125 miles to visit my daughter and family, I made special effort to walk the dogs early so I took them out at 7am, they were shocked!

Stepping into the front garden the sun bleached the colour from the pesky Spanish bluebells

ea1

When I saw this photo I couldn’t think what shrub this was, then realised it’s Gilliae Shadownia plant!

ea2

A view up from the path, spot the bindweed invading from next doors garden.

ea3

Dido is trying to smell the camellia.

ea4

Up around the block is a window I’ve always admired, in the shade this morning though. Discovery is a nursery.

ea5

This tiny council border always has a little colour.

ea6

if you look through the window of St Clares Chapel you can see the morning light on the window on the other side of the building.
ea7

Here is St Clare’s, glowing in the morning light. It’s built from Heavitree stone, I think they still have a service here occasionally.
ea8

These pods are left from autumn, anyone know what the tree is? Jude maybe?

ea9

These are the Livery Dole Almshouses, next to St Clare’s, built by Lady Louisa Rolle in 1849, to replace earlier ones dating back to 1594. Livery Dole, from the old English Leofhere – the man who owned to land, and Dole meaning a piece of land, is a small triangle dividing Heavitree road from Magdalen road. Until 1531 heretics were burned at the stake at the junction nearby, hence the name lots of history here!
DSC_0316
This is a very difficult challenge for me, dawn is before 6am at present and I would need to drive a few miles to photograph anything interesting, so this is the best I could do, phone photos on a dog walk!

What’s a’Float?

Krista at the Daily Post has chosen the them of Afloat for this weeks photo challenge. I wanted to avoid the obvious, much as I love boats, so this is what I came up with.
First of all, on the beach last weekend Dido came close to being afloat and certainly looks as if she is!didoafloat
I think she was surprised at the speed of the waves coming in.
Maybe Scarlett is using her toy box as a boat, who knows what goes on in the mind of a toddler. scarlettafloat
And lastly, I took this photo of a local pub many years ago. At the time I used photoshop 7 and played with the Omni effect on this photo. I’ve always thought it makes the pub look like it’s floating in the canal.doublelockssphere copy
Do you agree?
If you would like to join in visit the daily post to see lots of entries.

A Touch of Evening Blur

I’m really looking forward to summer evenings when I can go straight from work, to the coast for a stroll, a Pimms and a little supper. By then dark evenings like I’ve captured below will be a total blur in my mind. Meanwhile I hope these meet the challenge !

If you click the link you can join the weekly photo challenge of Blur.

As Fleeting as . . .

The finest film of liquid, suspended in and encapsulating the air. That’s ephemeral to me.

“One thing I love about taking photos is that it forces me to be present — to consider and appreciate now, before now evaporates and becomes then.” Says Krista at the Daily Post for this weeks photo challenge. Click any photo for a bigger view.

What do you find ephemeral? maybe sculptures in sand or ice, perhaps pavement art? You can join in or see other interpretations if you click the link.

 

Dartmoor Walls

 

Containing livestock
Containing livestock

Like many upland areas around the UK and the rest of the world, dry stone walls can be found all over Dartmoor. Some are hundreds of years old and have fallen into disrepair, others are well maintained and still functioning as they were intended.

Near Scorhill
Near Scorhill
The Two Bridges road
The Two Bridges road
North of Two Bridges, towards Wistman's Wood
North of Two Bridges, towards Wistman’s Wood

The name refers to the lack of any mortar used in the construction, although often nature takes its course and soil arrives and fills in the gaps.

Up close and covered with lichen and moss
Up close, covered with lichen and moss

I’ve always loved these old walls,  to run my hand across the granite is a journey back to the dawn of time on our planet, and to make contact with all the hands that have touched before me. Dartmoor’s dry stone walls may not be as grand as those built by the Incas in Peru and I don’t suppose they can be seen from space like the Great  Wall of China, but they are living, breathing masterpieces in their own way.

Cheri Lucas Rowlands has created the photos challenge of Wall this week, click to join in.