Category Archives: Gardens

Weekly Photo Challenge: Depth

This week, share with us your take on “depth” — you can take it literally, like me, by showing something (a dense forest, your lawn after a blizzard) that suggests volume, a distance between surface and bottom. Or go with a more figurative approach: use a deep color palette, play with your image’s depth of field, or highlight a person, a place, or an object to which you feel deeply connected.

So this is my response to Ben’s challenge.
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In the depths of Cornwall there is a view deep down from a shop window at this pub!
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Still in Cornwall, the depth of the cliff near Padstow is quite scary if you hadn’t planned to walk the narrow path and you’re wearing the wrong shoes.
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The cellar in the depths of Mottisfont Abbey has visible remains of it’s medieval priory.
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I like the multi layered depth of this sculpture at Broomhill.
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Sissinghurst Castle is renowned for its garden ‘rooms’ and if you look down into the depths from the tower you get a great perspective.

Join in at https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/depth/

A Bench with Daisy

Jude at https://smallbluegreenwords.wordpress.com/bench-series/ is running a monthly challenge with the theme of benches this year and January’s topic is ‘In the Garden. I’ve already posted one photo but I came across this one today and as it made me smile maybe you will too. daisy bench This is Daisy, I don’t remember what she was laughing at, but this is a typical Daisy expression and it comes with a happy ‘grrrhhh’ and a lot of tail wagging. She was probably enjoying the fresh air at Hartland Abbey garden in north Devon. Or maybe she wanted me to sit on the bench so she could have a rest too!

January’s Bench Dream

 

 

For a summer loving lass like me, a balmy hour on a garden bench surrounded by plants is perfect. This one is at Penshurst Place, near Royal Tunbridge Wells, taken last June.
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Jude has created a new monthly challenge, a photo of a bench. She has discovered that lots of people have a passion for taking photos of them, and have many in their collections. I’m a one of those bench anoraks, as well as windows and doors! If you are too, why not pop over http://smallbluegreenwords.wordpress.com/bench-series/ and join in?

Jude says,

For some time now I have been photographing benches when I come across them. I like benches. I especially like them when they are placed in a convenient position, like half way up a hill, or on the top of a cliff, preferably with a view. Some benches have plaques, some have slats, some are made of wood, some are good (to sit on). So for the next year, as a new feature, I am going to post a photo of a bench/seat each week. So you can take the weight of your feet and relax and breathe…

Jude is a real garden lover, so she is kicking off the challenge this month with the theme of garden benches

A Garden by the River Dart

My last post from Greenway focuses on the garden. A lovely relaxing place, like most gardens it’s at it’s best in high summer but still plenty to see in April. Views of the river Dart are ever present and often make you stop and draw breathe.

Here are a few photos, click for a larger view and enjoy!

Cotehele, views in the grounds

Cotehele has beautiful grounds, with broad vistas of the river Tamar – which forms the border between Devon and Cornwall, off in the distance. cote2

The house is built from grey granite, lovely in sunshine but perhaps a little foreboding on a grey winter day.

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But there are always fresh sights opening up.
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They have a large variety of daffodils, some very old with wonderful fragrance.
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Plenty more spring flowers.
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And I don’t know how many favourite flowers a girl is allowed, but these are some of mine.
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I only had time to see a small part of the beautiful gardens at Cotehele, so I must go back later in the year. Perhaps then I’ll take a woodland walk to the river bank.
Click on any photo for a clearer view.

The Bears Hut at Killerton

In 1808 Sir Thomas Acland built a rustic summerhouse for his wife Lydia in the grounds of their estate at Killerton. Two generations later, their grandson shipped a bear over from Canada and kept it as a pet. The summerhouse became the Bear’s Hut and has been known as that ever since. Now it’s the highlight of a visit for children, on Saturday I sheltered from a shower of rain, but I’d like to have a tea party there!