A Morning Challenge in Heavitree

 

This morning person has no problem getting up, but finds it harder to get out the door. Today I was awake at 4.45, stressing about all the things I have to do and up at 5.20!I love the quiet hours around dawn, so yesterday partly because of the photo challenge, and partly because I was going east 125 miles to visit my daughter and family, I made special effort to walk the dogs early so I took them out at 7am, they were shocked!

Stepping into the front garden the sun bleached the colour from the pesky Spanish bluebells

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When I saw this photo I couldn’t think what shrub this was, then realised it’s Gilliae Shadownia plant!

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A view up from the path, spot the bindweed invading from next doors garden.

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Dido is trying to smell the camellia.

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Up around the block is a window I’ve always admired, in the shade this morning though. Discovery is a nursery.

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This tiny council border always has a little colour.

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if you look through the window of St Clares Chapel you can see the morning light on the window on the other side of the building.
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Here is St Clare’s, glowing in the morning light. It’s built from Heavitree stone, I think they still have a service here occasionally.
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These pods are left from autumn, anyone know what the tree is? Jude maybe?

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These are the Livery Dole Almshouses, next to St Clare’s, built by Lady Louisa Rolle in 1849, to replace earlier ones dating back to 1594. Livery Dole, from the old English Leofhere – the man who owned to land, and Dole meaning a piece of land, is a small triangle dividing Heavitree road from Magdalen road. Until 1531 heretics were burned at the stake at the junction nearby, hence the name lots of history here!
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This is a very difficult challenge for me, dawn is before 6am at present and I would need to drive a few miles to photograph anything interesting, so this is the best I could do, phone photos on a dog walk!

APRIL IS NATIONAL PREVENT CHILD ABUSE MONTH

Lucid Gypsy:

There’s a high chance that you will know someone that has been abused, awareness is key, this must stop.

Originally posted on writerchristophfischer:

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APRIL ISNATIONAL PREVENT CHILD ABUSE MONTH

“EVERY UNWANTED TOUCH IS LIKE A BRAND, AN OPEN WOUND, A SCAR ON MY SOUL THAT NEVER HEALS…”

BE A VOICE FOR ALL ‪#‎CHILDREN‬PLEASE SHARE and help raise awareness. 

Here is some information that I picked up  from a Colorado news station

In 2013, there were 679,000 victims of child abuse and neglect throughout the United States; more than 10,000 were child victims from Colorado, according to the US Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children & Families. In 2014, the Kempe Children’s Center at Children’s Hospital treated 1,306 children for abuse, served 641 parents and caregivers and trained 9,605 child welfare professionals.

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The Blue Ribbon Campaign to Prevent Child Abuse started as a Virginia grandmother’s tribute to her grandson who died as a result of abuse. She tied a blue ribbon to the antenna of her car as…

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Community Payback and no Goldilocks

My weekend has been busy as always. Yesterday I was hoovering, I should say vacuuming the living room, when I became aware of a persistent sound of metallic scraping noises somewhere out in the road. I pootled on, hanging washing on the line in the sun, a great treat now that spring is here, and generally tidying. It wasn’t until I realised that the dogs were roasting in their living room window seat, and I let some fresh air in that I found out where the noise was coming from. A woman emerged from a large white van parked opposite, wearing a hoodie saying that her name was ‘Supervisor’.

I noticed the first of three young men because he was shovelling the gutter right beside the wheels of my car. A bit panic stricken, I threw the window wide for a closer look, and two more appeared. All three were wearing bright orange tabards with ‘Community Payback’ printed on them. The Devon and Cornwall police website has this to say

Community Payback can be part of a ‘community sentence’. A ‘community sentence’ means that the offender is supervised in the community and in the case of Community Payback has to carry out between 40 and 300 hours of unpaid work. This work benefits the community – and means the offenders pay back the community for their crimes by doing tough demanding work. For this reason members of public are encouraged to nominate Community Payback work projects for offenders which will benefit the community. 

I would have liked to go and talk to them but I was in housework clothes and had wet hair, so I made a point of catching the supervisor’s eye and each of the guys to say thank you. The road is now weed free, and has saved residents the task of clearing up, as the council no longer has the resources to do it, despite the outrageously high council tax.

This morning I was visiting my family, for two of my grandchildren’s birthdays. Louisa is seven and William is three, I have no idea where that time went. Today at 11am was Williams’s party but Louisa was over excited by 9.30 so I decided to take her for a calming down stroll. We set off around the block, ‘Getting out with nature’ as she puts it, picking tiny wild flowers and stroking catkins. There were a couple of flowers that mummy apparently says are weeds, to which I replied that weeds are just flowers in the wrong place.

After not very long Louisa wanted to go home, she didn’t want to miss a moment of the party. We had about fifteen minutes to walk and she had lost interest in wild flowers. More distraction needed! I challenged her to tell me a story about nature. She started by picking a forget-me-not and saying that a girl found lots of them on path. The girl picked and picked them, but she became very hungry and didn’t have any food. She passed the story on to me, so I sent the girl deep into the woods until she found a cottage.

You know the story, Goldilocks meets the three bears, sits on their chairs, eats their porridge and falls asleep in baby bears bed. Except that her name wasn’t Goldilocks it was Meg. The bears were pandas and the porridge was chocolate cake. We had a great time embellishing the story, making it ours. I hope that one day she will be walking with her granddaughter, telling stories about walking in nature with her crazy story telling mma.

So that was a little of my weekend, how was yours?

 

What’s a’Float?

Krista at the Daily Post has chosen the them of Afloat for this weeks photo challenge. I wanted to avoid the obvious, much as I love boats, so this is what I came up with.
First of all, on the beach last weekend Dido came close to being afloat and certainly looks as if she is!didoafloat
I think she was surprised at the speed of the waves coming in.
Maybe Scarlett is using her toy box as a boat, who knows what goes on in the mind of a toddler. scarlettafloat
And lastly, I took this photo of a local pub many years ago. At the time I used photoshop 7 and played with the Omni effect on this photo. I’ve always thought it makes the pub look like it’s floating in the canal.doublelockssphere copy
Do you agree?
If you would like to join in visit the daily post to see lots of entries.

A Lyme Bay Jurassic View

Jude’s  challenge this month is a bench with a view, naturally that’s impossible to resist. As far as I’m concerned, anywhere where there is a view of Lyme Bay is a winner and as it stretches for miles of Devon and Dorset there are loads of choices. This was taken on the south west coast path at Seatown , Dorset, where the Jurassic cliffs may reward you with a fossil or two if you’re patient and lucky.
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Visit Jude here to join in.

Come away with the raggle taggle gypsy-o

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