Thursday Evening in the Close

Cathedral Close, Exeter after a light meal at Cote, my current favourite brasserie. We crossed towards the cathedral, just because, and had a peep at this view.

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Then turned along the green.

cl2The lovely building on the left is Mols Coffee House, dated 1596.

cl3We were heading back to the car, but I lingered long enough for some pics in the early evening light.

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Then over the cobbles and away home.

cl7With the Royal Clarence Hotel, supposedly the oldest hotel in England, in the background.

Rhapsody in black and white

Paula’s Black and White Sunday theme this week is ‘Rhapsody’, this is what she says about the meaning,

Defined primarily as an instrumental composition irregular in form and suggestive of improvisation, then as an ecstatic expression of feeling or enthusiasm or an unusually intense or irregular poem/ piece of prose, rhapsody is also archaically known as a miscellaneous collection; jumble. 

And this is my interpretation.

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A lunchtime escape

A tolerable day at work is one when I can go out for some fresh air at lunchtime, without freezing or getting soaked. Last Wednesday was one of the very best for a stroll, the sun was shining, the morning had been dull and I needed some space.

Next door to the hospital where I work, is a psychiatric unit, around 150 years old and set in lovely grounds with original trees. If the ground is dry I often head that way, come along with me. We’ll begin beside the old lodge near the front gate.

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It’s like a miniature gothic castle with its crenalations.
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Here’s the back entrance. What can we find in the hedge?

I’m surrounded by birdsong, with a robin singing loudest. Look ahead, we’ll check out the trees.
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The bluebells are guaranteed to help get rid of the morning’s stresses.

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I zigzag from tree to tree, in and out of the hedge.

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jw8These fir cones, like my feet, are rather large!

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I would  have loved to climb this tree, it looks quite an easy one doesn’t it? The one behind on the left is quite special too,

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Look at the chunky bark, it’s been around for a very long time.
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On we go towards the perimeter of the grounds, where it’s a bit wilder, and someone’s had lunch already.
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Time to curve across the lawn, my half hour is flying by.
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But I still need to see that bright tree ahead.
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Wow, such a fresh and glowing green!
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I linger for a minute, enjoying the shadows, but my time really is up. Thanks to this stroll, the afternoon was manageable, two and a half hours until home time. I’m really lucky with the surroundings at work aren’t I? I hope you enjoyed walking with me, I’m sharing with Jo and looking forward to seeing where she walked.

Up Close on spring buds

I noticed these buds in the health centre’s garden this morning and had my little point and shoot with me. They were low enough to shelter from the breeze, so worth trying a close up. Judging from the one that’s about to unfold, I’d say it could be sycamore, does anyone know?

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I would love to be able to take real macros with a powerful lens, but I can still have fun even with my phone. This is my last post for Jude’s April garden challenge, with the theme of macro or close up, and I’ve really enjoyed it.
If you’re quick, you can still join in, visit Jude here.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Abstract

Ben Huberman asks us to ‘turn the concrete and familiar into something new and mysterious’. That could mean to capture an image from an unusual perspective, looking for strange shapes or textures or maybe an edit that changes an image completely.

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Is it obvious what this is a photo of, I don’t think so.

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But perhaps this is clearer?

Okay, just in case you can’t tell what it is yet!

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Do you have any abstract images to share? Join in with Ben’s Weekly Photo Challenge.

Traces of the past

Paula is asking for images with traces of the past for her Thursday Special this week.

Troy Odeon

This is the Odeion at Troy in north west Anatolia, Turkey, it dates back to the Roman Troy 1X and was renovated in 124 AD, by Hadrian. I wonder if that was before or after he built the wall in the north of England, what a busy man. The Odeion has a semi-circular orchestra, surrounded by a wall of lime stone slabs, above which rise tiers of limestone seats, divided by aisles, into wedge shaped sections. Can you imagine the performances that took place there?  I’m sure you can still hear the echoes on a hot, still day. . .

Thanks Paula, I could do lots of posts for this theme.