Tag Archives: Nature

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A Birthday Poem

Today is the day, but as always I plan to have a birthday month, so I spent yesterday walking beside the river Bovey. This is the result.

Rushing Slowly

I contemplate the transience of the River Bovey.

Every molecule of water that flows past my feet

has a destiny, whether it is to evaporate,

to splash onto the shingle that scratches at my soles,

sink into the peaty soil

or connect with the vastness of the sea.

Every leaf, green, frosted or baked dry by the sun

will crumble, flake along the route

or wash up intact on a beach,

ten or ten thousand miles away.

Every little stick tumbles and rolls

between east and west river bank,

to be claimed by a golden retriever

or gathered by a green consumer

to give home a few minutes of warmth.

From its source between Chagford and Shapley commons,

the Bovey glides, swirls and gushes to merge with the Teign

and rush headlong to the sea.

We are as the smallest drops, the most delicate leaves,

chasing through our three score and ten.

Transient beings, swimming, floating,

crashing against the shore of life,

relentlessly struggling to connect

with the vastness of our race.

Work of Art

nature's artwork

Nature’s fair canvas coloured by skilful brush

each billowing cloud unique and fleeting in form hue and shade

each curve and sweep of landscape carved by mystical sculptor

each line of tree planted by a master hand

each blade of myriad green springs forth to reach its zenith

burns dry in heat of summer desiccates

lies  waiting for  the cycle of rebirth

each swell of tide turns ocean brown blue

turquoise and broken by white horses

what greater work of art could this gypsy capture

than nature’s dynamic masterpiece

Michelle W chose the theme for this weeks photo challenge over at the Daily Post, Work of Art. Join in here, http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/work-of-art/

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Blackbury bluebells

Last weekend I went to Blackbury Camp, an iron age hill fort in East Devon. Iron age puts it between 800 BC and 100 AD, and Blackbury is one of several similar in the south of England. The hill fort is around 200 by 300 metres and roughly oval and has ramparts constructed from flint and clay. It has stunning views over the surrounding woodland and pastures, and is now looked after by English Heritage.

I’ve been before but this time was really special, here’s why!

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It’s bluebell time, and this little place has the most perfect bluebell wood I’ve ever seen! Come and join me for a stroll.

I hope you enjoyed the view, I was overwhelmed by it’s beauty.

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Most fragrant treasure

carpets a wood nymph’s haven

relentlessly blue

 

 

Lazy Poets Thursday Haiku & resolving yesterday’s mystery!

seaweed

Lost Chlorophyll

 Once green tendrils found

safe harbour on the pebbles

crisply dried seaweed

ww

Well done to Christine, beach comber extraordinaire, as I write she is the only one to guess correctly! I wish I could tell you more about this seaweed but as it is so decayed I couldn’t identify it when I  searched. Isn’t it remarkable? Every scrap of colour and moisture has disappeared and you can see it’s skeleton if you click to enlarge.  I’d love to know how old it is. I found it at Beer and as that is on the Jurassic Coast perhaps its been lying there for millennia. Or perhaps it arrived with the winter storms! It’s surprisingly strong and survived being crushed in the bottom of my camera bag for several hours.

Has anyone seen anything similar? Any sciencey people able to explain?