Tag Archives: England

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A Garden by the River Dart

My last post from Greenway focuses on the garden. A lovely relaxing place, like most gardens it’s at it’s best in high summer but still plenty to see in April. Views of the river Dart are ever present and often make you stop and draw breathe.

Here are a few photos, click for a larger view and enjoy!

The Passion

Earlier in the week I learnt that Exeter was staging The Passion in the streets today, so camera armed I went to see the event. It began with a service in the Cathedral and a procession through the town. I found it in Bedford Square and got a space close to the front of a big crowd of people. 1 where this lady was the  signing interpreter. 2 and a Roman soldier  really looked the part. 3 Mary’s tears washed the feet of Jesus. 4 Judas betrayed Jesus to the scribes and Pharisees. 5 Elders of the tribe watched

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While a blind man told how Jesus had restored his sight.     7 Then Jesus was brought to  the council of High Priests.

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Je was taken before Pontius Pilate, who spoke with Jesus, then asked the people three times, why Jesus should be crucified.

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The crowd only shouted ‘Crucify him’

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And Jesus was taken away

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with Judas looking on.

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He carried a cross to ‘Calvary’

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Where common thieves were also to be crucified.

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He was nailed to the cross

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he prayed to God the Father until he gave his life

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and his body was taken down.

You know the rest of the story.

Agatha Christie, an American Connection

The volunteers at National Trust properties are a mine of information and very friendly. When I went into the library at Greenway I was immediately struck by a frieze/mural high on the walls, so I listened and joined in with another visitor asking the volunteer about it. Apparently the house was requisitioned by the army in WW2 and the painting was done by an American soldier.

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The mirror also has a tale behind it. There was a painting on the wall where it now hangs, of Churchill and Roosevelt together. When the war was over and the family were able to reclaim their home, they found the continuous gaze of the pair somewhat oppressive and painted over it!

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I’m sure the mural has been restored over the years, but I’d love to know who the soldier was and if he’s still around. Any ideas from my lovely American readers about how to find out?

An Agatha Christie Day

This weekend I have visited the home of Agatha Christie, Greenway in south Devon. Greenway is set on the banks of the river Dart with fabulous views to Dittisham and Dartmouth, just a few miles from her birthplace Torquay. Dame Agatha and her second husband Max

From the lower path
From the lower path

Mallowan bought the house in 1938 as a holiday home.

From the garden above
From the garden above

Here are a few pictures of the inside.

While we were in the library we listened to a recording of Agatha’s son saying that it was his favourite room in the house. I think it was mine too it was very homely and packed with collections from around the world.

I’ll show you more of the collections and the wonderful gardens in a separate post. Meanwhile some upstairs photos and the back door with  painting that I think is of Max.

related posts

http://lucidgypsy.wordpress.com/2012/11/09/agathas-greenway/

http://lucidgypsy.wordpress.com/2012/11/27/miss-christie-revisited/

Cotehele, views in the grounds

Cotehele has beautiful grounds, with broad vistas of the river Tamar – which forms the border between Devon and Cornwall, off in the distance. cote2

The house is built from grey granite, lovely in sunshine but perhaps a little foreboding on a grey winter day.

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But there are always fresh sights opening up.
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They have a large variety of daffodils, some very old with wonderful fragrance.
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Plenty more spring flowers.
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And I don’t know how many favourite flowers a girl is allowed, but these are some of mine.
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I only had time to see a small part of the beautiful gardens at Cotehele, so I must go back later in the year. Perhaps then I’ll take a woodland walk to the river bank.
Click on any photo for a clearer view.

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Cotehele, in the details

Anyone who has been following my blog for while will know that I love to look at the small details of a place or subject, especially when I visit a historic house. Last weekend at Cotehele was a real feast for my eye, so I thought I would share with you. I hope you enjoy this little gallery, click for a larger view and let me know which is your favourite!

The Great Hall at Cotehele

Cotehele is a Tudor manor house built between 1485 and 1539, high above the banks of the river Tamar in Cornwall. It was owned by the same family- the Edgcumbes,for six hundred years and is one of the best preserved Medieval manors in the country. They rebuilt the original 13th century property, before creating an even grander home a few miles away at Mount Edgcumbe, so Cotehele was little used and hardly changed over the centuries. The house became National Trust property in 1947 in lieu of death duty.
Today I’m showing you some of the armoury to be fond in the Great Hall.

And some other items I liked.

I’ll be back in a few days with some more photos of the house and garden.

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Looking Through the Squint

I’ve had a really lovely weekend, full of creativity and sunshine. Yesterday I went to a National Trust property just over the border in Kernow – Cornwall. They say that Cotehele probably originated around 1300 but most of the building took place in the late 15th century. I’ll post some more photos later but meanwhile here’s a little squint. A squint is a small peephole built into a wall, so that that owner could look down on other rooms to check what people were up to, they were often added in mediaeval times. At Cotehele this on looks down on the Great Hall.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Street Life

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‘A place reveals itself on its streets, from pedestrians strolling during lunch time, to performers entertaining tourists on sidewalks, to the bustle of local markets, and more. Whether you’re shoveling snow from your own driveway or walking a familiar route to work or getting lost in a foreign city, a snapshot of a street (or road or path) can tell a tale.’ So says Cheri Lucas Rowlands over at the Daily Post.

I’ve chosen street life from four different countries, each with many tales to tell.

The first is my own city, Exeter, in England.

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Fiumefredo in Sicily.

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Okohia, my ancestral village in Nigeria

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The last one is in New Delhi.

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Click for a bigger view and join in with the challenge at http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/03/28/street-life/