Category Archives: Uncategorized

Gratitude Jar and Lotus Leaves

From “Don’t judge a book by its cover” to “Don’t look at the jug, but at what it contains” (an old Rabbinic saying), we’re constantly taught that the contents of things are more important than the vessels, wrappers, and boxes that hold them in place. This week, let’s give outer shells their due and focus our lenses on things that contain other things.

Says Ben Huberman, at the Daily Post.

I love containers, who doesn’t? They are full of feminine symbolism.   I decided to snap a few of my favourite containers.

A wooden vessel from Malaysia, very smooth and curvy.
A wooden vessel from Malaysia, very smooth and curvy.

My Terramundi, a gift from my friends when I left a job
My Terramundi, a gift from my friends when I left a job

A bowl by my favourite ceramic artist Laurel Keeley
A bowl by my favourite ceramic artist Laurel Keeley

Driftwood sticks, shells and beach stones from all over
Driftwood sticks, shells and beach stones from all over

The gratitude jar that I began on January 1st
The gratitude jar that I began on January 1st

My last photo, the only one in colour, is a painting contained in a frame. It was painted for me by Stuart Whitelaw, and brought all the way from Australia when he and Christine visited last month. It is of the beautiful lotus leaves on the dam at Dadirri, Christine’s favourite plants.

Lotus leaves
Lotus leaves

This post is for http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/containers/ click the link to see more or join in.

A Truck with a Past

In the 19th century, granite was quarried at Haytor on Dartmoor and was taken along a tramway  to the Stover Canal. From there it went by barge to Teignmouth, then by sea around Great Britain and further.  The tramway was opened on 1820, by George Templar of Stover, a long distance footpath , the Templar Way is named after him.

Granite from Haytor was used in the building of London Bridge, the British Museum and the National Gallery.

Trains of up to twelve trucks descended from Haytor, with a horse behind to slow them down.  Remains of the tramway can still be seen on Haytor Down. The ‘Relic’ of a truck below is similar to the ones used on the tramway. This post is for the Weekly Photo Challenge of Relic.

truck

Visit http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/relic/

to join in.

Christine’s Service

Lucid Gypsy:

Last week I lost a dear friend, as did many of you. Here her husband and family share their tributes to her.

Originally posted on dadirridreaming:

Dear followers of Dadirridreaming,

Our family has been so moved by your tributes and good wishes, and would like to share some of the service that we held for our beloved wife, mother and nanna on Wednesday July 9.

There will be a link to a slide show shared sometime soon as well.

The morning before the service, I walked with Mitchell and Casey on the beach. As we reached the northern end, we saw a white faced heron fly from shag rock across the water straight towards us. It landed very close and did not take off as we walked back. As we reached the southern end on the way home, the white breasted sea eagle flew over us, really low.

The family greeted people as they arrived and then we carried Christine’s casket into the chapel. I had been able to paint the plain casket over the weekend and…

View original 2,807 more words

Farewell Christine my Dear Friend

Each day this year I have been tearing off a page of my calendar and writing a few words to go in a gratitude jar. On June 9th I wrote that I was grateful for spending two wonderful days with Christine and Stuart. Today, through my tears, I wrote that I was grateful to have walked beside this beautiful lady.
I’ve known Christine for three years and in that time she has been the loveliest, most supportive blogging sister I could wish for. At the end of last year she emailed me to say that she was planning to be in Paris this summer and would I be available if she and Stuart made the trip across the channel. Would I? Too right I would, it was a dream come true and I wrote back happily saying so.
In the week leading up to their arrival I lost quite a bit of sleep as, like a child at Christmas, I was so excited. Where could I take them? Would Christine actually like me once we met? Even little things like would they be comfortable enough squeezed into my tiny car. And then the day arrived. We met at a pub car park just outside Exeter and she was amused by its name, the George and Dragon. I was amused by her accent, not as Aussie as I’d expected, instead her voice was like an English lady with a touch of Australian, apparently from her grandfather.
I whisked them off for lunch at a riverside café where Stuart drew the garden where we ate, laughed and shared stories. They both loved the food and the stroll along the quayside, it was wonderful to have such appreciative visitors! Next a promised trip to Dartmoor, with Christine taking photos through the car window. We stopped at Chagford and explored the ancient church with its rood screen before driving high up the narrow winding lanes to Scorhill.
I chose Scorhill because I knew she would love both the stone circle and the hole stone in the North Teign river with its links to the feminine spirit. She was so at home in the big sky landscape where sheep and lambs nibbled at the sparse moorland grass, and oh how the sun shone for us as we walked. I dropped them back to their car, tired and happy – they had after all climbed Glastonbury Tor before reaching me that morning, with a plan to collect them bright and early on Sunday.
Stuart had half planned to do his own thing, so I was touched that he had enjoyed our day so much that he decided not to, despite it being partly day of garden visits! Our first stop was especially for him, to satisfy his passion for sustainable agriculture, we went to Riverford Farm where he was able to chat to someone and learn how Devon does it. We stopped to buy some local chilli chocolate which she was still eating a week later! Next, a quick stop at Dartington hall to see one of my favourite gardens,

At Dartington Hall garden
At Dartington Hall garden

 

and then a nice lunch in Totnes, with local food and cider.
A drive through the South Hams led us to Coleton Fishacre and the rain, never mind there was the house to explore and then tea and cake. By the time we’d devoured it the showers had passed so we strolled through the garden where they both found plants and trees native to Australia as well as many surprises that were new to them.

Christine and Stuart at Coleton Fishacre
Christine and Stuart at Coleton Fishacre

Not wanting the day to end I drove the scenic way home along the coast. Stuart was hilarious when we reached Torquay, ‘I can’t believe I’m actually at Torquay, he said before launching into a Fawlty Towers sketch. These special places of mine are even more precious now, a wonderful layer of memories have been added. When I left them at their B&B that evening I cried. ‘Now you must come to Australia’ they said, ‘you’re welcome any time’.
This is from an email I received soon after,
‘We had such an amazing time with you, it was really special, and just meeting was so wonderful … I feel we are heart sisters dear one!’

I do indeed feel like I’ve lost a heart sister, I am overwhelmed with sadness. Who would have imagined that less than a month later I would be writing this? My thoughts and prayers are with Stuart and their children and grandchildren at this time, I know I’m not alone.
We have lost a very special lady, an intuitive healer, a wise and loving soul. Christine sweet planet walker, you will be missed by so many, travel well.

A Banksy Contrast

Bristol museum has a couple of Banksy’s in it’s collection and I remembered this one when I thought about contrasts.

This isn’t how I tend to see an angel, the statue beneath may be, but Banksy has added a little something to make us think as usual.

banksy2
The trashy paint pan is in complete contrast to the angel. Here is what the Museum has to say about it.
banksy

and another look.
banksy1

What are your thoughts, are you aware of Banksy’s work?
Visithttp://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/contrasts/ for mlore contrasts.

The top of the Oast house in the distance

Another English Country Garden

The garden at Sissinghurst, in Kent was created in the 1930’s by Vita Sackville-West and her husband, Harold Nicolson. Now a National Trust property, it is looked after by a large team of gardeners and is divided into ‘rooms’, each with a different style, planting scheme colour theme. Here are some photos, I have masses of flower shots but for now I’ll show you general views of the garden.

This style of planter was new to me, very effective
This style of planter was new to me, very effective
An abundance of blooms in every direction
An abundance of blooms in every direction
A rosy corner
A rosy corner
The boat house in the background
The boat house in the background
Box hedge flower beds in the white garden
Box hedge flower beds in the white garden
A nice feature
A nice feature
The tower, up we go!
The tower, up we go!
And here is the view from the top.
And here is the view from the top.
A band playing on the lawn in the distance
A band playing on the lawn in the distance
The top of the Oast house in the distance
The top of the Oast house in the distance
A view of the garden 'rooms'.
A view of the garden ‘rooms’.

Sissinghurst was beautiful, it totally lived up to my expectations. There were a good few plants I’ve rarely or never seen, and many dark purple flowers which are my favourites. It was the last day of my holiday and I was suffering from garden burn out, they were all running into one, but I hope you like this little glimpse.

Room, to roam

Today I’ve had the most lovely day out with my very dear blogging sister Christine, of Dadirri Dreaming, as well as her husband S, who coped well with a crazy Devon Gypsy driving them up the narrow lanes. If you have been following Christine you’ll know that she has been travelling around southern Spain for a few days, quite a bit warmer than here but it stayed dry for us and I’m thrilled to bits that she came all this way!
I took them to one of my favourite places on Dartmoor, Scorhill. We went inside the shelter of the stone circle, plenty of room there and with a view.

Scorhill

 

Next we went on over the hill and far away where these ladies had plenty of room to roam.

roam

This post is for the Weekly Photo Challenge . . . Room! As always , click for a bigger view.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/room/