Category Archives: England

The top of the Oast house in the distance

Another English Country Garden

The garden at Sissinghurst, in Kent was created in the 1930’s by Vita Sackville-West and her husband, Harold Nicolson. Now a National Trust property, it is looked after by a large team of gardeners and is divided into ‘rooms’, each with a different style, planting scheme colour theme. Here are some photos, I have masses of flower shots but for now I’ll show you general views of the garden.

This style of planter was new to me, very effective
This style of planter was new to me, very effective
An abundance of blooms in every direction
An abundance of blooms in every direction
A rosy corner
A rosy corner
The boat house in the background
The boat house in the background
Box hedge flower beds in the white garden
Box hedge flower beds in the white garden
A nice feature
A nice feature
The tower, up we go!
The tower, up we go!
And here is the view from the top.
And here is the view from the top.
A band playing on the lawn in the distance
A band playing on the lawn in the distance
The top of the Oast house in the distance
The top of the Oast house in the distance
A view of the garden 'rooms'.
A view of the garden ‘rooms’.

Sissinghurst was beautiful, it totally lived up to my expectations. There were a good few plants I’ve rarely or never seen, and many dark purple flowers which are my favourites. It was the last day of my holiday and I was suffering from garden burn out, they were all running into one, but I hope you like this little glimpse.

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Making Entrances

Have you missed me a little?  I guess not, but since last weekend when Christine and Stuart were over from Dadirri, I’ve been away for a few days. I’ve taken around a thousand photos and these are the first few I will show you.

Entrances, doors and thresholds, they always fascinate me and I know I’m not alone. The gallery has pictures from Kent and Sussex, mainly National Trust properties, I hope you enjoy them, click for a bigger view.

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Blackbury bluebells

Last weekend I went to Blackbury Camp, an iron age hill fort in East Devon. Iron age puts it between 800 BC and 100 AD, and Blackbury is one of several similar in the south of England. The hill fort is around 200 by 300 metres and roughly oval and has ramparts constructed from flint and clay. It has stunning views over the surrounding woodland and pastures, and is now looked after by English Heritage.

I’ve been before but this time was really special, here’s why!

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It’s bluebell time, and this little place has the most perfect bluebell wood I’ve ever seen! Come and join me for a stroll.

I hope you enjoyed the view, I was overwhelmed by it’s beauty.

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Most fragrant treasure

carpets a wood nymph’s haven

relentlessly blue

 

 

The Lively Lady on the pebbles

Beer Beach

The craft fair season has begun and today I’ve been to a regular venue at Beer, in east Devon. It was a glorious spring day with a cool breeze coming off the sea, and lovely for  a stroll.

On the way to the beach
On the way to the beach

 

The Lively Lady on the pebbles
The Lively Lady on the pebbles

 

Looking east along the beach
Looking east along the beach
Beach huts waiting for summer
Beach huts waiting for summer
Time for a sit down
Time for a sit down
Lobster pots
Lobster pots
The fish shop on the beach is as fresh as you can get
The fish shop on the beach is as fresh as you can get

Plants will always strive to grow in the most unlikely places, including high up on the cliff face at Beer, the bright yellow and purple ones are wild wallflower. I think the more delicate yellow are a type of wild cabbage and the paler mauve are a mallow variety.

The beach at Beer is very special, unspoilt and traditional,  with ice cream and crab sandwiches, pebbles and driftwood and the opportunity to try your hand at mackerel fishing.

If ever you’re in Devon, pay Beer a visit, try a crab sandwich and then perhaps a  walk on the coast path to build up an appetite for cream tea!

Weekly Photo Challenge: Letters

Cheri Lucas Rowlands says

For this week’s challenge, share a photo with letters — no matter the alphabet. You can capture a neon sign, a sentence scribbled in an old phone booth, a random letter that’s seemingly out of place, or anything else. As you look through your lens, think about how your image might convey something bigger: a snapshot of how we communicate with one another, even if we don’t speak the same language.

 

 

Do you have letters to share? join in at http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/letters/

 

 

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A Garden by the River Dart

My last post from Greenway focuses on the garden. A lovely relaxing place, like most gardens it’s at it’s best in high summer but still plenty to see in April. Views of the river Dart are ever present and often make you stop and draw breathe.

Here are a few photos, click for a larger view and enjoy!

Agatha Christie, an American Connection

The volunteers at National Trust properties are a mine of information and very friendly. When I went into the library at Greenway I was immediately struck by a frieze/mural high on the walls, so I listened and joined in with another visitor asking the volunteer about it. Apparently the house was requisitioned by the army in WW2 and the painting was done by an American soldier.

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The mirror also has a tale behind it. There was a painting on the wall where it now hangs, of Churchill and Roosevelt together. When the war was over and the family were able to reclaim their home, they found the continuous gaze of the pair somewhat oppressive and painted over it!

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I’m sure the mural has been restored over the years, but I’d love to know who the soldier was and if he’s still around. Any ideas from my lovely American readers about how to find out?

An Agatha Christie Day

This weekend I have visited the home of Agatha Christie, Greenway in south Devon. Greenway is set on the banks of the river Dart with fabulous views to Dittisham and Dartmouth, just a few miles from her birthplace Torquay. Dame Agatha and her second husband Max

From the lower path
From the lower path

Mallowan bought the house in 1938 as a holiday home.

From the garden above
From the garden above

Here are a few pictures of the inside.

While we were in the library we listened to a recording of Agatha’s son saying that it was his favourite room in the house. I think it was mine too it was very homely and packed with collections from around the world.

I’ll show you more of the collections and the wonderful gardens in a separate post. Meanwhile some upstairs photos and the back door with  painting that I think is of Max.

related posts

http://lucidgypsy.wordpress.com/2012/11/09/agathas-greenway/

http://lucidgypsy.wordpress.com/2012/11/27/miss-christie-revisited/